What does residential assisted-living care look like?

4 years ago ·

What does residential assisted-living care look like?

Residential care homes offer a smaller, more home-like family setting for seniors.  These care homes are typically located in traditional homes and neighborhoods and provide care for fewer residents than assisted living communities. Service offerings include food services and assistance with daily living, part-time medical professional care is offered.  This live-in housing and care option is great for people who do not have skilled medical needs, such as a feeding tube or daily injections and a great option for individuals who are looking for a smaller-home-like setting.

There are seniors that enjoy the benefits of living in a home shared with other seniors. They have their own rooms, and occasionally bathrooms, but share common areas such as family room and dining room. The company of other seniors, especially when they have shared interests and experiences eliminates the typical feelings of loneliness and isolation experienced when living alone.

If you have ever watched an episode of the Golden Girls or seen the movie “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”, you will understand the warm, loving, and supportive environment that residential assisted-living can offer. When you transition to this type of environment, it is a less traumatic event as you feel that you are just moving from one comforting home to another without the added stress of having to worry about meal planning, upkeeping and home maintenance and still can continue to live with the choices you had before.

Want to learn more about residential senior living?  Call us today 519-534-5878 or Request your Information Package Today!

Image Credit: Golden Girls/Facebook

Read more 0

[Press Release] – Affordable Retirement Senior Living in Bruce County Peninsula set to ease senior housing crises in Ontario

4 years ago ·

[Press Release] – Affordable Retirement Senior Living in Bruce County Peninsula set to ease senior housing crises in Ontario

Summary: Wiarton Retirement Residence has opened a new retirement residence with an aim of alleviating retirement residence crisis in Ontario.

Ontario, Canada
Canada, like many other Western countries, is grappling with the issue of a rapidly growing older adults’ population. Statistics Canada project that the number of seniors in Canada is expected to be higher than that of children below fourteen years by the year 2021, with the number rising to ten million by the year 2036. In a Senior Housing Survey that was conducted by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Ontario has a total of 62,633 senior homes, an increment of 2.4 percent from last year’s figure. Analysts are of the opinion that the increment is not good enough. There is a great shortage of homes for older adults, with a prediction that the problem may escalate if no tangible action is taken. In its analysis of the Canadian Senior Housing Dilemma, the DBRS report indicated that housing is a national crisis affecting all Canadians regardless of age, but seniors experience greater problems since they tend to have specific housing needs. CHMC 2019 report observed that prices for senior care facilities are increasing in almost every province, a development which is attributed to the growing demand for senior care communities.

READ MORE

Read more 0

5 years ago ·

Wiarton Fall Fair

“The Biggest Little Fair In the North”

The Wiarton and District Fall Fair celebrated their 151st this year, a place to celebrate and preserve the local agricultural heritage.  The fair is a time to reflect on all the local agriculture accomplishments and learnings in the season.  It is an opportunity to celebrate another year of hard work and to show the next generation what it takes to feed our world.  The Wiarton Fall Fair continues to engage the local community and make this a fun educational event that shares experiences and information about agriculture and rural lifestyles.

This year’s theme was “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repurpose in our Rural Environment”.

Read more 0

How to Choose a Retirement Home

5 years ago ·

How to Choose a Retirement Home

The type of life you or your loved one have after retirement will be as unique as the life you had beforehand. For some of us, it is going to be a relatively simple choice to make, but others may not have that luxury for a number of reasons. For some, it could be a choice that isn’t necessarily voluntary, and this can mean navigating a variety of complex emotions as well as making large life changes. For others, it simply means how can we best transition to the next stage of life. Whatever the case may be, there are a number of steps you can take to ensure that you are making the right choices for yourself or your loved ones when considering retirement communities in Ontario.

1. Get everyone on board.

You’re going to need to consult with all of the important people in your life about what is coming. That could mean your spouse, your children, and your grandchildren, or whatever sort of family set up that may be. Prepare them for the transition that’s about to happen. It will also be necessary to get your place of employment on board as well. Making sure that everyone who has had a stake or say in your life is kept in on the loop and is okay with the decisions you’re making.

2. Consider all your options.

What can you realistically afford? What are you wanting to take with you? How active are you planning to be or where are you planning to travel? How capable are you of accomplishing things alone, will independent senior living be sufficient or do you need to consider assisted living or Long Term Care? These are all big considerations that you will need to make. The big consideration to make is what is best for you, your wants and your needs. After all, you are considering the rest of your own life.

3. After looking at your options, make a wish list.

When you have a clear scope of what fits the realistic capabilities you have, start looking at the options that best fit your lifestyle and needs. Make a list of the places and make an effort to get to know them as well as you possibly can. If it is an option, go and visit. Arrange a tour, and ask the management and staff questions. Use the information you gather to narrow down your list to what will be the perfect fit for you.

Once you’ve done all your research, talked it over with you and your stakeholders, you can move forward with making a confident decision. You’ll feel better walking into a scenario that you tailored to yourself.

Read more 0